Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Nagoya Protocol

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Nagoya Protocol

    Recently received this from a former collector of wild hellebore seed;

    The Nagoya Protocol came into force a few months after my last trip, and the UK are signatories of it, so if I were to collect seed in the future, I would be committing an illegal act. Itís a perverse piece of legislation, designed to protect the sovereign rights of the country where the seeds were collected. Basically, any profit, whether it is intellectual of financial, must be shared by the collector with the authorities where the seeds/plants have been collected. I guess itís designed more for new drugs being developed and the millions of dollars that generates, but whilst itís pitched as a piece of legislation designed to protect plants, actually it does the opposite because ex. situ conservation will come to an end. Think of all the plant enthusiasts around the world who have mini botanical gardens; species hellebore collections, etc. That will all end, at least on an up-front visible basis, anyway. There is a very well known nursery in the UK called Crug Farm Plants and they base their business on stock grown from wild collections. Itís unlikely they would ever get permission to collect. Even The Cyclamen Society, with all the permits they can get, have faced resistance when applying to collect live tubers on sanctioned field trips. I went on a Cyclamen Society field trip in 2003 and we were given permission by the Turkish government to collect 65 Cyclamen mirabile tubers. That wouldnít happen now.

    This may well explain why here seem to be no wild collected seed now offered for sale.



  • #2
    Very sad!

    Comment


    • #3
      I am planning a trip to my ancestral homeland in the middle of next year and was hoping to bring back some plant memories (hellebore seed collected from wild plants) b given the protocol I maybe prevented from doing so when leaving Croatia.

      Comment


      • #4
        very sensitive subject. wild collected seed have disappeared from the major seed suppliers. most of the wild seed and plants that have been over collected are collected and sold by the local population. economics plays a key role. in a poor rural setting with little oportunities the local folks look at these wild things not as treasures but as a resource. untill the economics change, native peoples will exploit their natural resourses.
        Jef I know that is a differant view point, but the local population have put enormus preasure on certain species that have a limited range with some colonies being roadside. I look at these regulations as a protection of a natural heritage. the problem is the balance and understanding of the situation.
        In the USA native americans have collected materal from their homelands and sold to us european anglo setlers. It is illegal. Federal laws in the USA have stingent regulation of collecting wild plants. the native americans for the large part ignore the regulations. in the USA they closed down collectors not by the collection regulation but by the internal revenue service. the bussiness of collecting wild things, even the illegal sales of plants, you have to claim the income and pay taxes on the sales. if you do not pay your taxes the IRS will track you down and close you up.

        anyways...HAPPY NEWYEAR!

        MAY THE NEW YEAR BRING A NEW UNDERSTANDING OF OUR WORLD PROBLEMS AND LET THERE BE A PATH TO SOLUTIONS THAT BENEFIT ALL!

        Comment

        Working...
        X